Bond account question

Not in this interest rate period.
I bought a 12% bond ipf 2027 in 2022. Company doing very well, paid previous bond through COVID.
The bond was to replace the bond of 7.25%.
No different with lendinvest. They have a multitude of bonds on the market at lower pre inflation/pre gilts era of <1%. Some as low as 6.5%
They are linked to property lending.
Tempted, as they are a 3 year bonds. Minimum purchase £1,000 via primary bid.
And that’s what I would buy, the minimum or at least not much more. House prices look to risky to me and that rate must be being passed on to the borrowers. Without checking it would have be development (house building) loans for me to have any interest.

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Not in this interest rate period.
I bought a 12% bond ipf 2027 in 2022. Company doing very well, paid previous bond through COVID.
The bond was to replace the bond of 7.25%.
No different with lendinvest. They have a multitude of bonds on the market at lower pre inflation/pre gilts era of <1%. Some as low as 6.5%
They are linked to property lending.
Tempted, as they are a 3 year bonds. Minimum purchase £1,000 via primary bid.
And that’s what I would buy, the minimum or at least not much more. House prices look to risky to me and that rate must be being passed on to the borrowers. Without checking it would have be development (house building) loans for me to have any interest.

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Yeah that’s way out my scope as I’m just reading books and or listening to audio books etc about basic investing etc, I was going to get into property investing 8 years ago but didn’t the rate of return got higher each year untik the final 4 years but it was 5k min buy in and I was to paranoid lol

I think the confusion from your original post @Kiava is because the capital gain on normal UK corporate and govt bonds (Gilts) is exempt from capital gains tax.

Tax on bonds and gilts - interactive investor.

BOS’s use of the word bond in their fix rate savings account is the cause of this confusion, as it is not a ‘Bond’ instrument in the normal sense (i.e. it’s not tradeable on an exchange)

As noted unless you’ve earned over £1000 in bank interest in a single tax year, you’ve nothing to worry about

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Yes that’s where I seen it somewhere about it being tax free like you said, but they told me it’s treated like any savings account and actully due to selling all mt gia and. Kr keeping track and ooenining one of those fake bos bond accounts I think it would take me over.

Not sure about the selling of stocks as I never withdrew any cash to my bank so how would they see? And anyways even though I made not bad profits from edts and a few single stocks over all I was at a loss selling in the red and rebuyibg in the isa.

If I went 2 year fixed on the bond I think when the account is complete the total interest would easily hit over 1k

Thanks

I wouldn’t use a bond for your ‘back up’ money; there no point if you may need to use it.

I would personally put it in high interest ISA. Chase (who I am with) are very generous both on their ISAs and Current Accounts. Chase as you probably know is JP Morgan and Chase. Even though you have to phone them to talk to somebody I find their customer care, second to none. They are very good.

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I won’t be using that money that’s money that will be in the bank and it’s the exact same amount I have kept in the bank since 2017 it’s the rainy day fund so it might as well be in a better account with better interest but without taking it out the bank. I get there is better returns etc at other banks and or you could take it out and invest…

But from what I have learned you should never take it out the bank to invest it seems to be a rule of thumb in investing 101.

This account I was putting it in does let me withdraw if need be so it’s all good.

P. A I actully didn’t know about chase being JP Morgan although it’s probably been said many times on my audio books etc but it’s hard tit ake it all in when I’m working as well.

Thanks for the information tho