Cineworld (CINE) 🎥

To be honest I agree, but it hurts a bit… I’ve lost more money in CINE shares than I’ve actually spent going to the cinema in the last 5 years! :grimacing:

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As I mentioned on another thread they could add charging points and do a deal of watch a film whilst your car charges. Often they have huge out of town car parks and it could be an added incentive.

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I feel your pain Ralf … I’m currently holding 5,500 shares. Eek!

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The trend had been moving them into town center locations so we’ll see if this continues. In the retail parks the landlord normally owns the carpark - I wonder is there is a retail focused REIT that could be a good long term investment?

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That’s a good point we probably all have :man_facepalming:

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I feel your pain more @Optimisery bloody hell that’s alot :pensive::face_vomiting::face_vomiting::face_vomiting:

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True you are correct but the landlords need the renters to be viable so negotiations could be made. Hell, they could split the benefits or even give the landlord the income to reduce rent increases but the park renters get more customers. Either way it is the kind of thing that could help these places. :+1:

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If cinemas fail it does companies like Disney no favours at all. That is why Disney have recently announced they will keep major film releases solely in cinemas for longer.
There are many examples of sports that used to be mainstream (eg cricket) that have become much reduced due to moving to pay monthly platforms. Cricket is desperate to attract a wider audience buy showing the 100 on mainstream tv.
Spin offs will continue to be popular on pay monthly platforms. However, big releases will need to be showcased in cinemas to keep the brand mainstream.
The risk of pay monthly only platforms is that there will be too many competing for niche markets. Many viewers now live in an individual viewing bubble that is unique to themselves and similar minded people.
Companies will need to reach out to wider audiences through cinema.
This is apart from the fact that people will start to socialise again and what better way than a cinema trip and a meal out.
Investors need to take a long term view. This is a typical example of invest only what you can afford and do it for the long term as part of a balanced portfolio.
There has been a lot of talk about debt. You can look at this from many angles. One could be that you can only extend your debt if a lender has faith in you. I can’t imagine that lenders have just blindly thrown money at Cineworld.
That said, it’s a risky business at the moment. Those that have invested and seen a recent loss should not necessarily wait and assume the price will rise again if they can’t afford to lose that money. That’s the typical gamblers mistake. Hold on only if you are prepared for the worse, but feel that better times may be ahead.

If your looking for a REIT that’s seems 99% proof of success try looking a $O realty income expensive at nearly $69 dropping in last few days from$72

Pays monthly dividend s too!

Read a fact other day it’s had 612 consecutive yield increases

If had bought in 1994 with 10k in money
With sp increase and dividends works out about 15% a year and worth £470k in money
Today! :heart::heart:

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For me, that may as well have been written in Chinese but seems like something good I think. :grinning:

:joy::joy: is that for my reply :man_facepalming:

Our favourite analyst has a similar view:

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Or the lenders know they have assets they can sell when it goes tits up? Seems a very strange strategy as a blanket view.

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Yes, but in a very friendly way :joy:

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Never seen his account before, he’s a very funny guy :joy: :+1:

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Most of their debt was amazed when they brought Regal Cinemas for $3.7bn in 2017, combined the whole is now worth £800m. They over paid in a risky strategy which has back fired, the lenders have to decide to sink the company or support it and hope. Thankfully they pulled out of another deal last summer but they’re being sued by Cineplex for doing a runner and have just settled with Regal share holders taking that deal to $3.9bn.

With total assets are worth around $1.1bn there isn’t much meat on this carcass and further support might have been their only realistic choice.

This is simple maths $8.9bn debt held against assets of $1.1bn is unmanageable. Someone will force this into an IVA, restructure and close about 40%-60%, break USA & European cinemas up & sell to a private equity firm. It’ll wipe out current shareholders but long term is the only solution.

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There are of course other ways to stream the latest content at no cost if you catch my drift but I don’t endorse anything which isn’t legal.

Where have you got this figure from?

Sorry should have been £889m. Quite a fall from the $3.7bn + $170m court settlement which should have added to the valuation of the business.

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Correct me if I’m wrong… I believe that the ‘Market Cap’ is the total value of all outstanding shares and is not to be confused with total value of assets.
Market cap fluctuates with share prices.