Ask your beginners questions here 🐣

I don’t think they’ll go negative but BoE might announce that it could be in play in the future

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Lower interest rates gives a boost to the stock and bond markets. A decrease in the interest rate is done to stimulate growth, incentivising personal and corporate borrowing to improve future profits, leading to higher share prices.

Bonds are also boosted because old issues give better yields, therefore, have increased demand, which raises prices, decreasing yields to match new rates.

Hi guys,

If I sell a share when the market is closed, will I be given a price, or will it be sold at the open price the next day?

Thanks,
Ollie

It will be sold at the best price available at 3pm - assuming you sell US stocks.

I have another question;

For (Acc) funds/ETFs, how does the accumulation reinvestment work if your ownership is low enough that you’d be nowhere near to getting a full share with the dividends? Do you lose them? Do they get ‘banked’?

ETFs distribute based on the number of shares you hold. You can only trade ETFs as whole shares on Freetrade so you will always get a dividend. In Acc funds they reinvest the dividends back into the fund so the Net Asset Value or NAV will increase and this is reflected in the price of the ETF

ETFs own 1000s of shares of its constituent so it gets paid all the dividends and it then either distributes to its shareholdera or accumulates depending on which ETF you go for.

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Hi. I am on the Discover tab of the Freetrade app. When looking at a stock, all I see is one price, e.g. HSBC is showing £4.19, and it doesn’t say what this is.
I have no idea if this is the buy, sell or mid price. Come on guys. Make this more intuitive. I want to see as a minimum buy and sell prices of a share at a glance without having to search so that I can check the spread of a share I may be interested in. If this price is hiding somewhere, then this app is really not intuitive.

The price is not even live, so I wouldn’t use it for trading at all. You’d be better of using other services for prices.

Hi, so what’s the ‘instant price’ option you see on the Plus membership? Do they at least show you the instant price before you buy/sell?

Better posting elsewhere? That’s not a question never mind a beginner question :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

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Beginner question - People seem to be able to know what a fund is investing in (I don’t mean the general description). E.g. that a particular fund held shares in Tesla or XYZ stock.

I looked at the fund page for say Legal & General Fossil Fuel Free fund and can’t see who they invest in.

  1. How do people generally find this out?

  2. Is it a requirement that funds share this information for transparency?

  3. Any tools people prefer for this information?

I want to avoid duplication where possible but can’t seem to get this right.

I couldn’t find the fossil fuel free fund you mention but if I want to see who a particular fund/etf was investing in, I would initially go to a website like Morningstar.

For example, if you wanted to take a look at the top holdings (and other details) of L&G Artifical Intelligence ETF, you can get a snapshot of some info here: Asset Allocation|Top 10 Holdings|L&G Artificial Intelligence UCITS ETF|ISIN:IE00BK5BCD43

Check out the options in the left hand menu once you’ve selectd your fund/ETF for more info.

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Thank you @weenie that is really helpful even though I too can’t find the fund.

It’s ticker is GPEH and more information here:

https://fundcentres.lgim.com/uk/en/fund-centre/PMC/FTSE-TPI-Global-ex-Fossil-Fuels-Equity-Index-Fund/

Newbie Question:

Do we get taxed for REITS in an ISA? Are there hidden charged we need to be aware of?

Are there any resources that cover REITS for UK Investors? I see on FreeTrade, that there are lots of REITS available from the USA, but my Google-fu is only picking up US based resources, approaching the asset class as if you were an American investor, so it is proving difficult to weigh the pros/cons of the asset class.

Hi. After a bit of newbie guidance. I am not a big money player so bear with me. I have £500 sat in a savings account doing nothing. I want to use it to start a portfolio and buy soon ETFs as the backbone. I will be adding about £50 a month into this. I don’t need to get at the money for 10 years. I am ok with risk. I have been reading around and found this article Freetrade: how to build your portfolio - Monevator really useful but I wasn’t sure which ETFs to buy with a small outlay of £500 that would be best suited to me. Any help, advice would be brilliant. Thanks.

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Only you can decide on what is best option for you based on your risk levels. But ETFs are a safer bet than trying to stock pick. Saying that you can’t go wrong with the S&P 500 which has just has a slight correction. You could split your potential ETFs to the S&P, FTSE and an emerging market you should be ok.

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You have some idea of what ETF you’re interested in yes?

What I would do is consider the pricing. At £50 per month, some ETF options will be out of your reach, for example; The much recommended Vanguard World (VWRP/VWRL) is priced at £75+ at the moment, and so you would have to save two months to buy one share, assuming the price stayed the same.

My personal view is that tracking the global market is a nice way to set and forget, so I’d look at the MSCI All World (there are three different ones with different price bands) and stick with that until you’re comfortable either investing more per month or to branch out into other ETFs/assets. But it really is up to you on how you want to go about it at the end of the day, but I would definitely check the pricing so that you’re able to invest your monthly goal.

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Is the current dip in the market typical or is it more or a burst bubble situation?

Don’t think anyone can answer that for sure until the moment has passed really.

Some think it is a market correction for overvalued tech stocks and because bond yields are making movements, so people are getting jittery.

Others will tell you it is every bubble bursting and we’re dead to rights for a stock market crash and the end of the world etc. Which wouldn’t really match up with how things are going IRL right now.

Good advice. Thanks. I’ve just looked at what I initially thought would be a good portfolio and I wouldn’t be able to buy each month.