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This is from a German stock I hold in my ISA - pretty hefty tax charge!

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@1anrs @samtuckett thank you, I knew it was something quite hefty. Think I’ll stick with my UK and US investments for the dividends.

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Hi all, couple of questions, any suggestions on how to avoid too much ETF cross over and are there any crypto specific ETFs for non plus members? I’m still deep in the learning phase so any responses greatly appreciated :smiley:

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26.375% on German dividends :facepunch:

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There aren’t any specific crypto ETF’s as they aren’t currently allowed to be sold to retail investors here in the UK. The nearest thing possibly could be one which the underlaying assets would be based around companies in that sector (eg. miners, etc), this may not be what you want though.

Regarding minimising cross over, it’s worth having a read though of this topic:

A good bit of useful information and ideas - as always though, do your own research.

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@JimmyJ is right, this thread in brilliant. It might seem a bit technical at times but if you take your time and google phases you’re not 100% on you’ll have a much better handle on your investments afterwards. Throw up some questions when you have them we might all learn something!

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Hi, so still reading, learning and watching videos and I’m looking at starting with a range of ETFs that reinvest as I’m not bothered for a dividend. I’ve got these so far and I’m intending an equal split of initial investment and each will get a monthly lump for approx 10 years (taking me to age 62) S&P 500 (VUAG), FTSE 250 (VMIG), FTSE EM (VFEG) & MSCI Europe (SMEA). This is still a draft plan so I’d welcome any thoughts. Just to add this will all be funded by disposable funds I’d like to work harder, I’ve already got a very good company pension. Cheers Steve

Just my thoughts but I started out not caring about dividends either. Having invested throughout some pretty bad world situations over the last 6 months, the shares which have paid dividends have kept me going. Just something to consider, as if things take a dip again you might end up really wishing you had some dividend income.

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Have you though about adding any exposure to Asia, South American, China or India?

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I have but still unsure which geographical zones to cover which needs more research, I did consider just going for a smaller investment into an accumulating all world ETF but want to avoid too much cross over. I’m enjoying the research though but you can get yourself into some real rabbit holes if you’re not careful!

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Oh the rabbit holes are real. You could always go with a global etc like VWRL and then pick areas you’d like to overweight your portfolio with regional ETF’s. Just keep an eye on the on going costs.

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VFEG/VFEM have fairly good exposure to China (33.3%)/India (16.6%), has some exposure to Brazil (6.6%) as well - Vanguard Asset Management | Personal Investing in the UK

Asia, as a wee pointer which is probably one of many ways to do this, my personal choice was VAPX along with a Japan specific ETF (SJPA), should cover the main Asia equities without overlapping China/India etc
Though you do get some overlap with Hong Kong in VFEG as well - Vanguard Asset Management | Personal Investing in the UK

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S&P 500 being the glaring stand out miss for me.

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Does anyone know how the P/E ratio is calculated on FT?i always get confused by it :rofl:

I havent worked that out yet :thinking: only on when sold shares! Tbh my portfolio is down by a few grand but some stocks was maybe bad investments or a long term,

Mainly ISA stocks are divs now so concentrating on them. Mainly now

Sauce

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Annoyingly I can’t remember where I heard it, but a PE ratio of between about 14 and 21 is seen as generally the ideal for a company, it means that the share price suggests reasonable confidence in the company while at the same time not being over-valued. However, as it says in Neil’s comment, PE ratio can be misleading and is not to be taken as gospel to the isolation of everything else. A low PE ratio could mean either that a company has great potential for growth, or it could mean it’s going to perform poorly. Similarly, a higher PE ratio doesn’t necessarily have to mean that the company is over-valued. Amazon’s 45 PE ratio and Tesla’s 95 are high due to the fact they are popular and people want to buy that stock more than the stocks of other companies with more reasonable ratios.

You’ll find that industries have different P/E that they’ll be judged against. You can see simply Wall Street include market and industry P/E in their stock analysis, in this example it’s apple.

Sauce

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Ah ha, interesting, I didn’t even know there was a different market and industry PE Ratio - thank you.

I wonder if the 14-21 as the rough ideal still fits as a general rule? It seems to for both with Apple in this example.

Not so much. Banking trades on a low P/E simply Wall Street has UK banking at 4.6x

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