Finding AIM stocks

It would be good to be able to filter by stock exchange.

Currently if I want to find AIM stocks (no stamp duty, high risk) I have to go through the AIM site and enter them into FT to see if they are listed.

It would be great to have a resource (website list, in-app feature… SOMETHING!) which recognises the difference and shows what’s available on freetrade.

The AIM is still part of the London Stock Exchange rather than being a seperate exchange.

That being said, it would be useful to be able to filter by markets/sub-markets.

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Here you go… 82 AIM stocks on Freetrade right now… made the spreadsheet in 30 seconds so could be wrong… but should be pretty much correct… data hacked direct from LSE

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/198Dq-KvQV0WHhfDmyhD32DTAv3osEJXaRYGS2PpWahA/edit?usp=sharing

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That’s awesome, thanks very much!

Would you mind telling me how please? I’m not a total excel idiot so broad strokes is all I need.

LSE has an exposed API… easily manipulated… kick in an XMLhttp object In the VBA IDE and scrape it out by the ‘Ticker’ as the variable

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Or if you’re a FinKi API user, call the “indexName” function against an ISIN

For example,
https://finki.io/callAPI.php?isin=JE00BG6L7297&function=indexName&key= [INSERT YOUR API KEY]

finki.io/finkiAPI.html

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for those requesting that spreadsheet in other formats… @ow3n

as HTML

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vQpXAV8eAjXnqahRe0U3CJcrthbOfW5lZYwr1hIJSXHLoVeOEgR_nKaKh8iq0ZMSkijHl9TrZre59Ky/pubhtml

as CSV

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vQpXAV8eAjXnqahRe0U3CJcrthbOfW5lZYwr1hIJSXHLoVeOEgR_nKaKh8iq0ZMSkijHl9TrZre59Ky/pub?output=csv

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Could you give me permission to access the sheet please?

Don’t forget to vote for your own suggestion!

If it’s not already public I’ve messed up. You don’t need access you just need to copy/see it. Which I assume you can’t do I’ll republish shortly. My bad

Does it work as HTML? It’s supposed to be public…so should show

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vQpXAV8eAjXnqahRe0U3CJcrthbOfW5lZYwr1hIJSXHLoVeOEgR_nKaKh8iq0ZMSkijHl9TrZre59Ky/pubhtml

As above :point_up_2:if youre a Finki api user just call the ‘indexName’ function to identify AIM stocks. Simples.

Cheers for this mate, real cool

It’s likely very out of date now… so run the FinKi function over the FT Stock Universe spreadsheet yourself to keep up to date

DON’T!!! DON’T!!! DON’T!!! I think I will post on the main board as a topic, but here is my story- about 6 years ago I decided to do something with my savings and dip my toes in investing. Being clueless about everything, I was reading all sorts of forums about it, and looking for the cheapest broker. I found one, then later on I found another one, even cheaper. Both of them were FCA authorized. Unfortunately my “investing” turned to gambling, since observing how quick penny stocks went from nothing to 10x, 100x or even more X fueled gambling addict in me, rather than an investor. Needless to say in the end I held only penny stocks, vs other stocks. To make story short, my very very hard earned money became loses and I learned my lesson. I sold out all shares and closed one account, but left other open (since I had “hope” that last share left will go up, while it went down, down and even more down). Some time ago, I received email, telling me, that the broker that I had an account with, went under and is taken over by different company. So imagine yourself in a situation when you cannot access your money, cannot trade and cannot do anything with your money… I was the lucky one, because even I incurred losses by selling out penny stocks, I closed my account, in order not to have any temptations. Today I received a phone call from a company that took over the failed one. It seems, there is so many dodgy things going on, that it might be in a news for a while.

Apparently there were some dodgy director dealings (directors of trading company), who were doing some things on a side (insider trading?), then there were overcharging for transactions, and so on and so on.

That is on the top of AIM companies being dodgy as they are- when director owns more companies than is humanly possible, making no money for shareholders in any shape or form (posting profits, paying dividends, etc), milking the company for their personal gain (paying the wages, bonuses, trips, etc etc), making placements one after another, making promises that have nothing to do with reality and so on and so on.

My advice is - stay away from AIM companies. If you do thing about it, perhaps you are a gambling addict, rather an investor. When I look back ago, I probably looked like an addict going to bookies for my fix, except everything was made with a push of a button on a keyboard. Most my gains were on paper - unrealized and losses were real.

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Why would anyone “invest” in AIM companies? What is the attraction and draw here? Question for new to investing people and more seasoned ones.

First of all almost every AIM company is plagued by Biblical proportion of disasters, oh boy they have explanation scrolls ready for you to explain their cash burn and underachievement of promised results. Probably could post them in Hebrew too :slight_smile:

2 Every director of AIM company gets a fat salary. Plus everyone on a board of directors get generous reward too. A lot of times it is bigger than working for a company with longer track record and listed on LSE. This is a huge red flag. I don’t mind rewarding people for their work, but most companies on AIM are fighting survival, rather than prosperity game. Big salary is a drain on financials.

3 NO dividends.

4 Name changing. One year it is xyz mining, next year the name and ticker symbol gets a plastic surgery. It is renamed to ABC mining (resources, exploration)- use your imagination. In general renaming a company cost money. It is OK for some sort of big shot company, but for a company that barely scraps by on envelopes and A4 paper…? The only reason for this renaming game is to gain new “investors” or shall we say… a bit uneducated people in investing game…

5 When you google names of directors, a lot of times you will find career “directorship”. Nothing wrong with that, but why would anyone change jobs too often? Schizophrenia? Poor results? Got fired? Milked the company to the death and started another one? Oh, these past companies that someone was a director there do not exist anymore? Red flag.

6 Constant placements of their shares. Money needed there, money needed here… Zero results, but oh boy AIM companies love to dilute shareholder.

7 Share consolidation. That one is awesome! When company is about to go under just because of share price - 0.000001- use your imagination- something is not even funny, they come up with a rescue plan- a few zeroes get slashed and share is back to trading with less zeroes… So director can almost be proud pointing at “increased” price. That usually does not last very long- director, the family needs to eat, so just wait for another dilution.

I probably could continue on and on…

Personally for me the draw was inexperience as an investor, then some sort of hypnosis state when I started seeing that overnight the share can go up 10-100X. Unfortunately it is very poor risk management. What about being on receiving side and watching how £1000 invested becomes £100- £10- £1?

So my advice is stay with companies that are worth your hard earned money. For example Coca Cola might not make a lot of money as per increase in appreciation, but at least you will get dividends and sleep more soundly.