First EVER dividend payment

I received my first ever dividend payment of 86p this month - let the good times roll.

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Your snowball just got a bit bigger :boom:
Keep it rolling ! :comet:

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Hell Yeah!

I’ve recorded my upcoming dividend payment dates in an Excel workbook and look forward to watching the compounding effect unfold as I reinvest that money back into my portfolio.

I’ve really been quite absorbed in all this since joining FT back in April. Most of us have work pensions which essentially trade in S&S on our behalf. It’s a passive exercise which, I’m sure, the majority of us don’t ever really give much thought to. Discovering the FT app has breathed life into the whole experience by allowing me to cost-effectively steer my own ship :metal:

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Its about taking control. My first dividend payment was £1.19 started small but growing!

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Well done mate, sky is literally the limit from here :slight_smile:

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How do you find out when you recieve a dividend payment

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You’ll receive a message in app when you get it

Use google to find out when it’s due

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But please bear in mind that it’ll take a little while longer than Google says to receive the dividend payment.

Here’s how that works for UK & US dividends.

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I was really happy to receive my first dividend the other day too :slight_smile:

Though of course it’s cash, not accumulation. I would much prefer to re-invest that dividend into more shares to grow the portfolio value. I assume accumulation is not offered as partial shares are not yet supported?

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Accumulation would be something offered by the ETF and happens independent of the broker.
For a distributing ETF, automatic reinvestment would be a platform feature called DRIP.

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Ah, thanks.

I got a dividend on a stock, so I assume there’s no way to re-invest that. It was 60p on a £100 share, so pretty hard to re-invest that :slight_smile:

Correct. You’ll just have to wait until you have enough dividends to buy a whole share. That’s the disadvantage of high yield dividend stocks if you can’t buy fractionals and don’t need the income.

It would be better to have a high growth, low or zero dividend stock. This way you get your “compounding” for free automatically (the company is reinvesting profits it to itself to be able to create even more profits in the future), instead of cash sitting in your account earning 0%.

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60p can buy you one Lloyds share - that money doesn’t need to sit idle in your account! :smile:

Yield is 5.48%.

(this is not a recommendation to buy of course - DYOR)

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Yeah, you don’t necessarily need to reinvest it in the same stock to get compounding effect

It does make it easier if you have a large enough number of shares that the dividends will buy at least one share in something

So, now after three months of investing, I’m already starting to receive decent dividend payments (IMO).

One thing is clear to me - the amount of dividends I’ve accumulated far exceeds the interest I would have earned from leaving the same amount of money in a bank account or regular ISA. It’s a really good feeling, re-investing money earned from dividends back into my portfolio.

It’s early days, of course, and I’ve mentally prepared myself for the highs and lows (I’m in it for the long haul) but, so far, I’m very happy with my investments and the FT app :ok_hand:

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