What’s your loss?


(Emma) #21

Following on from the bond point, these stats show the importance of a diverse portfolio to counter volatility in certain sectors.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-12-20/what-putting-10-000-in-these-assets-would-have-returned-in-2018


(Emma) #22

If someone could close the markets before Mnuchin does anything else to ‘calm’ them, that’d be great :see_no_evil::confounded::cold_sweat:


(Asa Carter) #23

As of today, I’m down 2.6% on Card Factory but my dividend return more or less makes up for that loss.

I’m keeping these for the long term though. I think it’s a great company.

Still waiting for the dividend to be paid into my investment ISA though.


#24

Losses keep on coming :crazy_face:


#25

I keep a share in my portfolio - I call it my memento mori - it lost 96% of its value. I’ll never sell it.

Thanks RBS for teaching me humility.


#26

If it reaches 100% loss, will it still be active? Or does that mean the money is now lost?


(Kenny Grant) #27

That particular share is unlikely to go to 0 (i.e. bankruptcy), but many do. I somehow managed to avoid RBS but it was at one point seen ss a safe bet, then it bought ABN Amro, and the rest is history (Barclays almost bought it just before). I like the idea of a momento mori investment Dave, it’s also nice to see people sharing their losses, not just successes.

Merry Christmas everyone.


(Jim) #28

To be sold as a Capital Gain writeoff for the Freetrade profit… :sunny:


#29

Unfortunately it was in my SIPP!


(Chris) #30

-5.62% as of this morning. Thankfully still have some winners in my list!


(Jim) #31

Hope your SIPP was diversified or you’ll be working until you’re 100 :wink:


#32

It is, that was part of my attempt at a HYP, which overall is doing ok but far too much work for me. Mostly in VUKE, VWRL, VGOV and GOLD now.


#33

As of right now I’m down -1.87%. Not bad considering the downturn the market has taken.


#34

My biggest loss is on Merlin Entertainments, 4.88% down :disappointed_relieved:


#35

This is very impressive - i’ve stopped looking, it just makes me sad.


(Georgi) #36

I am up 20% this year :sunglasses:
Cashed out all my positions at the recent all-time highs, only left my position in Randgol, which I closed earlier this month aswell. Currenty sitting at a good old savings account and couldn’t be happier.
There are a lot of very compelling companies right now though , waiting for Freetrade US stock and will start getting back into the markert slowly but surely.


#38

Gold hasn’t done so well in the last few years. Have a look at the iShares page for that ETC. From what I recall Gold prices rise when Stocks go down and vice versa.

Warren Buffet spoke on Gold investing vs Shares earlier on in the year and said for every dollar you could have made in American business, you’d have less than a penny of gain by buying into a store of value which people tell you to run to every time you get scared by the headlines - source


#39

The interesting thing about gold is that it has been a real store of value over the years - as one of my former mentors said, an ounce bought you a tailored toga in Roman times and it buys you a very nice suit now.


(Vladislav Kozub) #40

They kind of do but kind of don’t. There is an older reply which looked at 30 years’ Gold vs S&P 500 prices and how those correlated with each other. Whilst the correlation is negative, it is very weak and very close to “no relationship at all”:

SPG

In any case, stocks are significantly more likely to outperform gold in long term :slight_smile:


#41

At this rate, a very long term :frowning:

But hey, what else did Warren Buffett say:

If you expect to be a net saver during the next five years, should you hope for a higher or lower stock market during that period?

“Many investors get this one wrong. Even though they are going to be net buyers of stocks for many years to come, they are elated when stock prices rise and depressed when they fall. In effect, they rejoice because prices have risen for the ‘hamburgers’ they will soon be buying.

“This reaction makes no sense. Only those who will be sellers of equities in the near future should be happy at seeing stocks rise . Prospective purchasers should much prefer sinking prices.”

Source: http://blog.roywalker-ifa.com/2018/01/warren-buffet-on-hamburgers.html